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Fort Dodge police officer loses consciousness after traffic stop and exposure to possible fentanyl


This news story was published on March 4, 2019.
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Fort Dodge police

FORT DODGE – A Fort Dodge police officer lost consciousness this weekend after a traffic stop and exposure to possible fentanyl.

On Sunday, March 3, 2019, a Fort Dodge Police Officer conducted a traffic stop on the Kenyon Road Bridge at approximately 5:00 P.M. Upon contacting the female driver, she began giving false identification information to the officer. The female was ultimately identified as Kayla Potter, 28 years old of Clare, Iowa. It was discovered that Ms. Potter was operating the vehicle without a valid license and subsequently taken into custody on Providing False Identification Information and Driving on a Suspended License, both simple misdemeanors. Ms. Potter made her initial appearance in Webster County Magistrate Court at 9:00 A.M. Monday morning.

While on scene of the traffic contact, the officer handled an unknown substance before transporting the female to the Law Enforcement Center (LEC). While transporting the female, the officer began feeling dizzy and lightheaded. So much so the officer himself radioed dispatch to have medics dispatched to the LEC to examine him. When officers and medics arrived to the LEC to assist, they discovered the officer to be lethargic and unresponsive in his patrol vehicle.
The officer was transported emergent to Unity Point Hospital, and given at least two doses of Narcan, an opioid overdose reversal drug, while beingtransported. Additional Narcan doses were administered after arriving to the emergency room. The officer quickly recovered the Narcan treatment and was kept overnight for precautionary observations before being released around noon today.

“At this time it is suspected the unknown substance is a form of fentanyl, but until further testing is completed, we cannot be certain,” Fort Dodge police said in a prepared statement. “Although many similar instances have occurred nationwide to first responders, this was the first incident we are aware of in Fort Dodge. The officer is doing well and recovering at home with his family.”

POTTER, KAYLA MARIE

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11 Responses to Fort Dodge police officer loses consciousness after traffic stop and exposure to possible fentanyl

  1. Avatar

    Anonymous Reply Report comment

    March 6, 2019 at 12:21 pm

    Sounds fishy. Hands Are very low in dermal absorption. Are they sure he wasn’t sampling what he should have been confiscating.

    • Avatar

      Anonymous Reply Report comment

      March 6, 2019 at 1:49 pm

      You aren’t as smart as you think you are. Could have been stuck with a needle or maybe the drug was a liquid and not a powder.

      • Avatar

        Anonymous Reply Report comment

        March 7, 2019 at 12:35 pm

        Article said handled, as with hands. Nothing about injecting himself. As far as absorption, the absorption rates from the dept of health rate the hand as a 1.3, compared to a 11.8 for the genitals. Oil based products absorb faster than powders. Maybe he rubbed it on his crotch. That would make the story believable.

  2. Avatar

    Anonymous Reply Report comment

    March 6, 2019 at 12:18 pm

    Something smells fishy. I think it might be a good idea if this officer has random drug testing for a while. Sounds like an episode for Reno 911.

  3. Avatar

    Anonymous Reply Report comment

    March 5, 2019 at 11:17 pm

    Question you should be asking and worried about is when does mason city get to enjoy the fallout of this awesome new drug! Can you even wait for heroin and fentanyl. Mix that with the meth that already plagues this town plus great city council ideas and section 8 imports and you have the perfect recipe for total absolute and utter bullshit. Everyone that can leave should do so. Everyone who can’t should dust off their zombie lore and embrace the hell that’s coming.

    • Avatar

      Anonymous Reply Report comment

      March 6, 2019 at 6:16 am

      Heroin is already here. I had attended a couple outpatient classes at Prairie Ridge and almost all of the people were there for heroin addiction.

  4. Avatar

    Anonymous Reply Report comment

    March 5, 2019 at 7:26 pm

    Why wasn’t he wearing gloves?

  5. Avatar

    Anonymous Reply Report comment

    March 5, 2019 at 4:30 pm

    They bring this crap in through our Southern Border with Mexico. Build the wall and STOP it.

    • Avatar

      Anonymous Reply Report comment

      March 6, 2019 at 11:49 am

      You are right about the southern border, but it comes in hidden in cargo ships, trucks, and cargo planes. Building a wall will do nothing to stop the flow of opiods. Back in the day when the concern was marijuana, maybe, but not today.

      • Avatar

        Anonymous Reply Report comment

        March 6, 2019 at 5:55 pm

        Bull Shit and you know it. At the very least a wall will free up more officers for inspection. And, they do bring this crap across the border at all areas.

  6. Avatar

    DrOz Reply Report comment

    March 5, 2019 at 2:01 pm

    If it was a drug, (fentanyl), she should be locked up for 20 years, at Gitmo.