On November 9th, 2021, St. Gabriel Communications, 88.5 mhz, Adel, IA, filed an application with the Federal Communications Commission for authority to construct a new noncommercial educational FM broadcast station to operate on 89.9 mhz, at Mason City, IA. Members of the public wishing to view this application or obtain information about how to file comments and petitions on the application can visit https://enterpriseefiling.fcc.gov/dataentry/views/public/nceDraftCopy?displayType=html&appKey=25076f917ce2e04b017d002e8c140a22&id=25076f917ce2e04b017d002e8c140a22&goBack=N#sect-chanFacility

On November 9th, 2021, St. Gabriel Communications, 88.5 FM, Adel, IA, filed an application with the Federal Communications Commission for authority to construct a new noncommercial educational FM broadcast station to operate on 89.9 FM, at Spencer, IA. Members of the public wishing to view this application or obtain information about how to file comments and petitions on the application can visit https://enterpriseefiling.fcc.gov/dataentry/views/public/nceDraftCopy?displayType=html&appKey=25076f917ce2e04b017ce708493e0cfb&id=25076f917ce2e04b017ce708493e0cfb&goBack=N
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Cerro Gordo County Conservation projects announced



This news story was published on July 19, 2019.
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Zirbel Slough

MASON CITY – Cerro Gordo County Conservation projects announced this week.

Director Mike Webb says the Cerro Gordo County Conservation is working on two major projects beginning this summer and continuing through the fall:

The first is a habitat improvement project at Zirbel Slough. The south wetland at Zirbel will be dewatered this summer to encourage the growth of emergent and submergent aquatic vegetation and eliminate any carp that are in the wetland. The process needed for the vegetation to re-establish will require the wetland basin to be dry this fall (2019) and most of the growing season in 2020. Removing the water creates the proper seed bed for the beneficial aquatic vegetation, such as bulrushes, cattails and coontail, to germinate and grow. The new vegetation will provide a food supply for waterfowl and provide habitat for the many varieties of invertebrates that will also return when the water returns. The re-established plants will keep the water clear, which will promote this invertebrate growth. Invertebrates are very crucial to waterfowl at various stages of their life. Invertebrates provide a necessary source of protein for hens. The protein provided by the invertebrates allows the hens to create a healthy fat layer, which they need for their migration to the nesting grounds while also suppling them with the energy needed for egg production and nesting.

The water level reduction will also eliminate the current carp population in the wetland. Carp are detrimental to wetlands as their feeding behavior destroys the plant community and constantly stirs up the soil in the bottom of the wetland. Carp feed by grubbing out the plants. As they grub out the plants, which destroys the plants, the soil particles that held the plant in place are disturbed and become suspended in the water column decreasing the water clarity thereby preventing any new plant growth.

This project will bring long term benefits to the wetland; however, it will reduce the over water hunting opportunities for one to two seasons.

The second major project is a recreational improvement project on the Prairie Land trail. This fall, beginning in late August, another two miles of trail surface will be developed from old railroad bed to compacted lime chip. Along with trail surfacing two bridges will also be converted from their existing status to a usable riding surface with attached safety railing. This project will add a two-mile addition to the six miles of trail already completed. The new addition will be between 190th street and 170th street. This two-mile addition is part of a 21- mile trail development project that goes from the south edge of Mason City (240th street) to the county line at Meservey (100th street). Additional sections of the trail will continue to be developed as funding becomes available.

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7 Responses to Cerro Gordo County Conservation projects announced

  1. Anonymous Reply Report comment

    July 20, 2019 at 1:19 pm

    De-water for the carp, hillbillies will throw them all back in next year.

  2. Allen Reply Report comment

    July 19, 2019 at 12:39 pm

    I didn’t know that there was a trail between MC and Meservey. I good map would help.

    • Anonymous Reply Report comment

      July 20, 2019 at 10:34 am

      right. confusing when we are supposedly building the one through town here.

  3. Anonymous Reply Report comment

    July 19, 2019 at 12:13 pm

    Where is the finished part of the trail? I’m assuming the south end? how far have they gotten? More pic’s for the stories if you could? Is the trail ending at lime creek or is it going to go further north? out to the archery range would be great!

    • Anonymous Reply Report comment

      July 20, 2019 at 3:32 am

      https://www.cgcounty.org/home/showdocument?id=9892
      Map on page 2

      Prairie Land Trail
      13773 240th St

      The Prairie Land Trail is a Rails to Trails program trail that spans 21miles. The trail runs from 240th St in SW Mason City to 100th St SW of Meservey.
      The trail surface is in various stages of development.
      The northern most portion of the trail is crushed limestone and the remaining is old rail bed with the ties.

    • Anonymous Reply Report comment

      July 20, 2019 at 7:03 pm

      To the original poster: That’s cute, you think Matt does a bunch of actual reporting…? No, 90 percent of his site is press releases that he signs up to receive automatically through email. You could do the same.
      Going out to take pictures for a press release story is beneath the genius MM.

      • William Randolph Hearst Reply Report comment

        July 21, 2019 at 2:35 pm

        Very observant! And much of that 90% is copy and paste “fillers” from other cities. The fire in Cedar Rapids, the dog bite in Sioux City. Mattie is here to sell your personal brousing history and make a few pennies with each click. He is not in the news business at all.