Breakthrough Web Design - 641-201-1459 - Build Your Online Presence
News & Entertainment for Mason City, Clear Lake & the North Iowa Region
• Founded 2010

Former Cerro Gordo county auditor Ken Kline given award before retirement


This news story was published on January 29, 2019.
Advertise on NIT Subscribe to NIT

Photo via Iowa Secretary of State Paul Pate

DES MOINES – Tuesday, Iowa Secretary of State Paul Pate presented Deputy Commissioner of Elections Ken Kline with a National Association of Secretaries of State (NASS)Medallion Award.

“Ken was the Cerro Gordo County Auditor for 25 years before spending the past year in my office,” Pate said in a statement. “His impact on Iowa’s elections is immeasurable. Ken retires on Friday & we wish him nothing but the best.”

Earlier this month, Pate announced Mr. Kline would be retiring. He also announced the hiring of Heidi Burhans as Iowa’s Administrator of Elections. Burhans will serve as a key liaison with all 99 county auditors and the Iowa Legislature. She is currently the Madison County Auditor.

“I’m thrilled to have Heidi Burhans joining my team,” Secretary Pate said. “Her experience working with county auditors across the state and her dedication to clean, fair elections will be a big benefit to our office,” Secretary Pate said.

Burhans will begin serving as State Administrator of Elections on February 1.
“It is an honor to be named Administrator of Elections by Secretary Pate,” Burhans said. “Preserving the integrity of the election process is more important than ever. I look forward to providing county auditors with the support necessary to keep the election process secure and accessible for the voters of Iowa.”

Heidi Burhans is currently in her second term as Madison County Auditor and Commissioner of Elections. She is a legislative liaison for the Iowa State Association of County Auditors. Burhans also serves on the State Election Administrators Training Curriculum Board and Iowa’s Mental Health Risk Pool Board. Burhans previously worked as the city clerk of Truro.

Kline joined the Iowa Secretary of State’s Office in January 2018 after serving 25 years as the Cerro Gordo County Auditor. He is a past president of the Iowa State Association of County Auditors, creator of the national award-winning Precinct Atlas electronic poll book program and worked for many years as a legislative liaison for county auditors.

“I am grateful to have been part of a hard-working team of professionals who are dedicated to the principles of good elections,” Kline said.

His last day on the job will be February 1.

“Ken has made a tremendous impact on elections across the state and in our office. He is a dedicated elections official who has served Iowa well for many years,” Secretary Pate said. “Ken is a true friend and we all wish him the best on a well-earned retirement.”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

 characters available

15 Responses to Former Cerro Gordo county auditor Ken Kline given award before retirement

  1. Avatar

    Anonymous Reply Report comment

    February 2, 2019 at 10:08 am

    Way to go Ken ! You and your croney public servants know how to screw the retirement system.

  2. Avatar

    Anonymous Reply Report comment

    February 1, 2019 at 9:37 am

    Way to go Ken – you are like the rest of the public employees – You people always know how to WORK the system at low wage taxpayer expense. Chuckle chuckle ?

  3. Avatar

    Spike Reply Report comment

    January 31, 2019 at 4:02 pm

    Congratulations Mr. Kline for being recognized for a job well done.I don’t know Ken personally, but he impressed me as a person of knowledge and integrity. It’s a big task to run a fair election and should be taken seriously which I think Ken did and he shared his knowledge statewide to finish up his career.Also he EARNED his pension.No luck.Just an agreed to benefit as part of his employment. I know elections require a big time and education commitment as I have a family member that heads up elections in her county in Minnesota.She takes elections seriously and is very knowledgeable.Last election she put in 22 hours.Congrats again Mr.Kline

  4. Avatar

    Anonymous Reply Report comment

    January 31, 2019 at 8:25 am

    By takeing the higher position before retirement he probably gained 15 to 20 thousand per year in IPERS retirement – they promote a lot of lackies right before retirement so they get more retirement money. 80% of what they make will employed not enough for pubic servants.

    • Avatar

      anonymous Reply Report comment

      January 31, 2019 at 8:36 am

      BS from the crazy person again. Why don’t you go back to bed?

  5. Avatar

    Anonymous Reply Report comment

    January 31, 2019 at 8:20 am

    Hell why not the Nobel Peace Prize ?

  6. Avatar

    Anonymous Reply Report comment

    January 30, 2019 at 11:16 am

    Hmm, he doesn’t look retirement age.

    • Avatar

      Anonymous Reply Report comment

      January 30, 2019 at 3:21 pm

      Ken is in his mid 60’s…Maybe living in Des Moines with a wife and family back here , it may have become more than expected. Why is everything a conspiracy theory on here..

      • Avatar

        Anonymous Reply Report comment

        January 30, 2019 at 6:22 pm

        Must be nice to be able to retire before 72

        • Avatar

          Anonymous Reply Report comment

          January 30, 2019 at 9:23 pm

          Sounds like a personal problem to me. I retired the day I turned 65. It just takes sound financial planning..

  7. Avatar

    Lawsteward Reply Report comment

    January 30, 2019 at 6:57 am

    …me thinks something smells bad here…?

    • Avatar

      Anonymous Reply Report comment

      January 31, 2019 at 9:29 am

      Really, Why does someone retiring smell bad?

  8. Avatar

    Anonymous Reply Report comment

    January 30, 2019 at 2:46 am

    question is, why is he retiring after only one year with the state, NOT the job he thought it was gunna be?? or if he knew he would retire when he was old enough, one year to go, why did he take the job, surely after one year he wont get much retirement from the state or ipers. doesn’t make sense

    • Avatar

      Anonymous Reply Report comment

      January 30, 2019 at 8:18 pm

      His IPERS would continue from his years with the county.

  9. Avatar

    Anonymous Reply Report comment

    January 29, 2019 at 6:55 pm

    Way to go Ken !