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DEA releases strategic planning guide to prevent drug use among college students


This news story was published on January 24, 2020.
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College kids will be deterred from ingesting illegal drugs if this program is successful.

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration recently released Prevention with Purpose: A Strategic Planning Guide for Preventing Drug Misuse Among College Students. This new publication provides a road map for college and university-based prevention professionals to address campus-wide drug misuse issues.

“With vaping, marijuana use, and the abuse of prescription drugs on the rise, it is critical we continue to do everything we can to reach at-risk populations such as college students,” said DEA Acting Administrator Uttam Dhillon. “DEA’s new publication provides valuable information unique to prevention experts working in higher education to help ensure the health and wellbeing of our nation’s college students.”

The college student demographic – comprising 18-25 year olds – continues to be an age group of significant concern due to the usage rates for illegal substances. According to the American College Health Association’s National College Health Assessment, 11 percent of college students misused a prescription drug in the last year. The National Institute on Drug Abuse’s Monitoring the Future study indicates that daily marijuana use by college students has continued at record levels, and the vaping of marijuana by college students doubled from 2017 to 2018.

As drug abuse among college students rises – most notably involving vaping, marijuana, and prescription drugs – DEA continues to provide the tools necessary to prevent drug misuse before it starts. Prevention with Purpose is DEA’s latest effort to support drug misuse prevention on college campuses and in surrounding communities. It serves as a clear and concise “how to” guide for systematically measuring the scope of drug misuse issues; building relationships with key stakeholders; and planning, implementing, and evaluating drug misuse prevention efforts. The guide also includes a complete set of tips, tools, and worksheets to assist in applying prevention strategies.

For more information and to receive updates on campus-based drug misuse prevention efforts, visit www.campusdrugprevention.gov.

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14 Responses to DEA releases strategic planning guide to prevent drug use among college students

  1. Avatar

    Anonymous Reply Report comment

    January 26, 2020 at 12:49 pm

    HaHaHaHaha The institutes of higher learning includes massive drug use. Booze, cannabis, molly, blow, and…wait for it…adderall is #1 (speed). And the sex is constant. Hip hip hurray!!!! American U.

    • Avatar

      Anonymous Reply Report comment

      January 26, 2020 at 12:53 pm

      ..and let’s not forget vaping…tobacco. Hugely demographic base of tobacco users right NOW!

  2. Avatar

    Manuel Shifter Reply Report comment

    January 25, 2020 at 9:45 am

    Good, if they are going to legalize marijuana because people are using it or doing it anyway, then I want all the speed limits raised by 25mph. Why cant I drive as fast as I want?

    • Avatar

      Anonymous Reply Report comment

      January 25, 2020 at 10:37 am

      You can, however, you also have to accept the responsibility for breaking the law.

  3. Avatar

    Anonymous Reply Report comment

    January 25, 2020 at 7:57 am

    Now they have discovered that smoking pot is as bad on your heart and lungs as tobacco all we have to do is wait for the pot heads to drop dead.

    • Avatar

      Anonymous Reply Report comment

      January 25, 2020 at 8:01 am

      the old man starts the morning with one of his really, really. dumb statements. Probably top 5 of all time.

      • Avatar

        Bill Reply Report comment

        January 25, 2020 at 3:34 pm

        “marijuana smoke contains many of the same toxins, irritants, and carcinogens found in cigarette smoke — a known contributor to heart disease as well as cancer.”, according to Harvard Medical School.

        https://www.health.harvard.edu/heart-health/marijuana-and-heart-health-what-you-need-to-know

        First published in August, 2017. Updated June 24, 2019.
        “One of the few things scientists know for sure about marijuana and cardiovascular health is that people with established heart disease who are under stress develop chest pain more quickly if they have been smoking marijuana than they would have otherwise. This is because of complex effects cannabinoids have on the cardiovascular system, including raising resting heart rate, dilating blood vessels, and making the heart pump harder. Research suggests that the risk of heart attack is several times higher in the hour after smoking marijuana than it would be normally.”

        So, Anonymous January 25, 2020 at 8:01 am, I think you are the one that started the morning with one of his really, really. dumb statements. Probably top 5 of all time.

        • Avatar

          Anonymous Reply Report comment

          January 25, 2020 at 4:58 pm

          Hey Bill (ha ha LLaarreee), read your own post.
          “people with established heart disease who are under stress develop chest pain more quickly if they have been smoking marijuana than they would have otherwise”
          People with “established heart disease who are under stress” will probably develop chest pain if they walk to the liquor store or if they lie too often like you.

          • Avatar

            Bill

            January 25, 2020 at 9:17 pm

            Anonymous January 25, 2020 at 4:58 pm

            The name is Bill, not whatever your fantasies dictate. Now if you were able to read the linked article, which that quote came from,you might learn something. Then there is also this neat thing called the internet, maybe you’ve heard of it? Anyway, you can look things up there. Now when I look for things, I try to find reputable sources. Not like CNN, Young Turks,Wikipedia. Like I used as a source earlier, Harvard Medical School.

            Another quote from the same article as before, the last sentence is very important.

            “While this does not pose a significant threat to people who have minimal cardiovascular risk, it should be a red flag for anyone with a history of heart disease. Although the evidence is weaker, there are also links to a higher risk of atrial fibrillation or ischemic stroke immediately following marijuana use.”

            They aren’t talking about people established heart disease there. I’m just bringing you in some information. What you do with it, is up to you. We know that your mind is already made up, you want legal pot. I figure it should be treated at least as bad as cigarettes. Tax it like they do smokes and alcohol, put the penalties in place((DUI)Yes, I know they are already there, start enforcement, same fines and penalties)).

          • Avatar

            Anonymous

            January 26, 2020 at 8:29 am

            Hey Bill, thanks for the response and the research. I generally don’t bother with the research because people like the troll are not smart enough to understand it anyway.

          • Avatar

            Anonymous

            January 26, 2020 at 10:18 am

            “While this does not pose a significant threat to people who have minimal cardiovascular risk,…” The same could be said about cigarettes, alcohol, milk, chocolate and so on. By the way, I did read the article and it doesn’t say pot is bad, it says if you smoke it, and you have heart disease or breathing problems, the harm it causes outweighs the health benefits. I buy that idea. But the original post is lacking intelligent ideas and is asking for people to die in order for him to happy. This misguided and hateful comment is, I think, more detrimental to health than marijuana.

  4. Avatar

    Anonymous Reply Report comment

    January 24, 2020 at 6:04 pm

    Good luck with that!

  5. Avatar

    Allen. Reply Report comment

    January 24, 2020 at 3:09 pm

    Can’t wait to see how this turns out. I’m thinking, kind of like the “DARE” program. Wether we like it or not, marijuana will someday be legalized in all states. By the time these kids get to college, they have already decided to smoke marijuana, and the government is not going to stop them. I’m just saying that I think the money could be spent in another way then trying to stop this problem, which it won’t. And no, I don’t have the answer.

  6. Avatar

    Anonymous Reply Report comment

    January 24, 2020 at 11:35 am

    33 states have legalized medical marijuana. There are 11 states who have legalized recreational marijuana. Maybe the DEA should focus on drugs like Adderall and meth and leave marijuana to the states to deal with.